Suppressing Eclipse Java Proposals

classic Classic list List threaded Threaded
4 messages Options
Reply | Threaded
Open this post in threaded view
|

Suppressing Eclipse Java Proposals

Pr. Olivier Gruber
Hi,

I am teaching Java programming directly in Eclipse and my students get
confused by the Eclipse proposals to fix compiling errors.

Although the functionality is great, the net result is that students
blindly follow the proposals and end up with messed-up code.

Given I want them to learn Eclipse and Java development in Eclipse, I am
wondering how to:

      Suppress code proposals in the Java editor

      Suppress template proposals in the Java editor

Completion is fine, but I want just absolutely no proposal to fix
compilation errors.

Doing it via setting up preferences could be a good start,

but it will not be good enough, since students would turn it back on...



So I would like to go in the code, build my own version of Eclipse, and
disable the functionality entirely.

Can any one point me in the right direction in the source to
short-circuit the proposals and templates.

Many thanks in advance.

--
Regards,
Pr. Olivier Gruber.
University of Grenoble-Alpes

_______________________________________________
jdt-dev mailing list
[hidden email]
To change your delivery options, retrieve your password, or unsubscribe from this list, visit
https://dev.eclipse.org/mailman/listinfo/jdt-dev
Reply | Threaded
Open this post in threaded view
|

Re: Suppressing Eclipse Java Proposals

Jonah Graham
You can turn off which proposals are provided with Preferences -> Java -> Editor -> Content Assist -> Advanced.

Inline images 1

You may want to look at other settings such as Preferences -> Java -> Editor "Report Problems as you type".

If you really want to disable them in the code and rebuild, you can track down which preference each of those connect to and hardwire it (e.g. "git grep" the string in the UI and find out its preference value). (However, if you are worried about the students just turning it back on, it seems that they can obtain it from eclipse.org/downloads and have the full functionality again.)

HTH
Jonah


~~~
Jonah Graham
Kichwa Coders Ltd.
www.kichwacoders.com

On 2 December 2017 at 20:13, Pr. Olivier Gruber <[hidden email]> wrote:
Hi,

I am teaching Java programming directly in Eclipse and my students get confused by the Eclipse proposals to fix compiling errors.

Although the functionality is great, the net result is that students blindly follow the proposals and end up with messed-up code.

Given I want them to learn Eclipse and Java development in Eclipse, I am wondering how to:

     Suppress code proposals in the Java editor

     Suppress template proposals in the Java editor

Completion is fine, but I want just absolutely no proposal to fix compilation errors.

Doing it via setting up preferences could be a good start,

but it will not be good enough, since students would turn it back on...



So I would like to go in the code, build my own version of Eclipse, and disable the functionality entirely.

Can any one point me in the right direction in the source to short-circuit the proposals and templates.

Many thanks in advance.

--
Regards,
Pr. Olivier Gruber.
University of Grenoble-Alpes

_______________________________________________
jdt-dev mailing list
[hidden email]
To change your delivery options, retrieve your password, or unsubscribe from this list, visit
https://dev.eclipse.org/mailman/listinfo/jdt-dev


_______________________________________________
jdt-dev mailing list
[hidden email]
To change your delivery options, retrieve your password, or unsubscribe from this list, visit
https://dev.eclipse.org/mailman/listinfo/jdt-dev
Reply | Threaded
Open this post in threaded view
|

Re: Suppressing Eclipse Java Proposals

Daniel Megert
In reply to this post by Pr. Olivier Gruber
Hi Olivier

The suggested way to disable the Quick Assists/Fixes won't work, as those are not content assist proposals.

> Although the functionality is great, the net result is that students blindly follow the proposals and end up with messed-up code.
What do you mean by "messed-up code"? If we propose wrong fixes, then please file a bug report and cc me.

And, as said by Jonah if your students don't refrain from using the Quick Fixes when told so, they will for sure download a version where they are enabled again.

Dani



From:        Jonah Graham <[hidden email]>
To:        "Eclipse JDT general developers list." <[hidden email]>
Date:        02.12.2017 21:20
Subject:        Re: [jdt-dev] Suppressing Eclipse Java Proposals
Sent by:        [hidden email]




You can turn off which proposals are provided with Preferences -> Java -> Editor -> Content Assist -> Advanced.



You may want to look at other settings such as Preferences -> Java -> Editor "Report Problems as you type".

If you really want to disable them in the code and rebuild, you can track down which preference each of those connect to and hardwire it (e.g. "git grep" the string in the UI and find out its preference value). (However, if you are worried about the students just turning it back on, it seems that they can obtain it from eclipse.org/downloadsand have the full functionality again.)

HTH
Jonah


~~~
Jonah Graham
Kichwa Coders Ltd.

www.kichwacoders.com

On 2 December 2017 at 20:13, Pr. Olivier Gruber <olivier.gruber@...> wrote:
Hi,

I am teaching Java programming directly in Eclipse and my students get confused by the Eclipse proposals to fix compiling errors.

Although the functionality is great, the net result is that students blindly follow the proposals and end up with messed-up code.

Given I want them to learn Eclipse and Java development in Eclipse, I am wondering how to:

     Suppress code proposals in the Java editor

     Suppress template proposals in the Java editor

Completion is fine, but I want just absolutely no proposal to fix compilation errors.

Doing it via setting up preferences could be a good start,

but it will not be good enough, since students would turn it back on...



So I would like to go in the code, build my own version of Eclipse, and disable the functionality entirely.

Can any one point me in the right direction in the source to short-circuit the proposals and templates.

Many thanks in advance.

--
Regards,
Pr. Olivier Gruber.
University of Grenoble-Alpes

_______________________________________________
jdt-dev mailing list

[hidden email]
To change your delivery options, retrieve your password, or unsubscribe from this list, visit

https://dev.eclipse.org/mailman/listinfo/jdt-dev
[attachment "image.png" deleted by Daniel Megert/Zurich/IBM] _______________________________________________
jdt-dev mailing list
[hidden email]
To change your delivery options, retrieve your password, or unsubscribe from this list, visit
https://urldefense.proofpoint.com/v2/url?u=https-3A__dev.eclipse.org_mailman_listinfo_jdt-2Ddev&d=DwICAg&c=jf_iaSHvJObTbx-siA1ZOg&r=1UITCR5rxUZHSFczvfaNFK4ymEbEiccRX7VKchpqz0Y&m=XqjwkaQWar-jDKspiIAjaMybjdL7k8i0Yg19L2819BA&s=m5uV3BuA9PomkfRAZoMxWjPgbC28JJ9v2ArqwoS8o3g&e=



_______________________________________________
jdt-dev mailing list
[hidden email]
To change your delivery options, retrieve your password, or unsubscribe from this list, visit
https://dev.eclipse.org/mailman/listinfo/jdt-dev
Reply | Threaded
Open this post in threaded view
|

Re: Suppressing Eclipse Java Proposals

Pr. Olivier Gruber

Hi Dani,

Sorry for the misleading "messed-up code" statement.

I didn't mean that Eclipse was proposing wrong fixes, it proposes possible fixes, some of them making sense given the program to write, some others making little sense in that context. For instance, students are often confused at the beginning between static and non-static fields or methods. Being half in one world and half in the other, by their own confusion, Eclipse may propose to qualify as static some fields in some classes, which would solve the compilation problem, but would only in fact worsen the situation where nothing should have been static in the first place. Something that Eclipse has no way of knowing or inferring.

So, I am sorry, but it seems that my question remains, where in JDT is the support for Quick Assists/Fixes

and how can I short-circuit it? Thanks for any pointers in the JDT plugins.

That leads me to another question, it seems that JDT would have  hooks to track the activity of the users?

I am talking about the hooks used by Eclipse to report usage patterns.

How can I locate those hooks in the code?

Many thanks in advance for your answers.

Olivier.





On 03/12/2017 19:49, Daniel Megert wrote:
Hi Olivier

The suggested way to disable the Quick Assists/Fixes won't work, as those are not content assist proposals.

> Although the functionality is great, the net result is that students blindly follow the proposals and end up with messed-up code.
What do you mean by "messed-up code"? If we propose wrong fixes, then please file a bug report and cc me.

And, as said by Jonah if your students don't refrain from using the Quick Fixes when told so, they will for sure download a version where they are enabled again.

Dani



From:        Jonah Graham [hidden email]
To:        "Eclipse JDT general developers list." [hidden email]
Date:        02.12.2017 21:20
Subject:        Re: [jdt-dev] Suppressing Eclipse Java Proposals
Sent by:        [hidden email]




You can turn off which proposals are provided with Preferences -> Java -> Editor -> Content Assist -> Advanced.



You may want to look at other settings such as Preferences -> Java -> Editor "Report Problems as you type".

If you really want to disable them in the code and rebuild, you can track down which preference each of those connect to and hardwire it (e.g. "git grep" the string in the UI and find out its preference value). (However, if you are worried about the students just turning it back on, it seems that they can obtain it from eclipse.org/downloadsand have the full functionality again.)

HTH
Jonah


~~~
Jonah Graham
Kichwa Coders Ltd.

www.kichwacoders.com

On 2 December 2017 at 20:13, Pr. Olivier Gruber <[hidden email]> wrote:
Hi,

I am teaching Java programming directly in Eclipse and my students get confused by the Eclipse proposals to fix compiling errors.

Although the functionality is great, the net result is that students blindly follow the proposals and end up with messed-up code.

Given I want them to learn Eclipse and Java development in Eclipse, I am wondering how to:

     Suppress code proposals in the Java editor

     Suppress template proposals in the Java editor

Completion is fine, but I want just absolutely no proposal to fix compilation errors.

Doing it via setting up preferences could be a good start,

but it will not be good enough, since students would turn it back on...



So I would like to go in the code, build my own version of Eclipse, and disable the functionality entirely.

Can any one point me in the right direction in the source to short-circuit the proposals and templates.

Many thanks in advance.

--
Regards,
Pr. Olivier Gruber.
University of Grenoble-Alpes

_______________________________________________
jdt-dev mailing list

[hidden email]
To change your delivery options, retrieve your password, or unsubscribe from this list, visit

https://dev.eclipse.org/mailman/listinfo/jdt-dev
[attachment "image.png" deleted by Daniel Megert/Zurich/IBM] _______________________________________________
jdt-dev mailing list
[hidden email]
To change your delivery options, retrieve your password, or unsubscribe from this list, visit
https://urldefense.proofpoint.com/v2/url?u=https-3A__dev.eclipse.org_mailman_listinfo_jdt-2Ddev&d=DwICAg&c=jf_iaSHvJObTbx-siA1ZOg&r=1UITCR5rxUZHSFczvfaNFK4ymEbEiccRX7VKchpqz0Y&m=XqjwkaQWar-jDKspiIAjaMybjdL7k8i0Yg19L2819BA&s=m5uV3BuA9PomkfRAZoMxWjPgbC28JJ9v2ArqwoS8o3g&e=




_______________________________________________
jdt-dev mailing list
[hidden email]
To change your delivery options, retrieve your password, or unsubscribe from this list, visit
https://dev.eclipse.org/mailman/listinfo/jdt-dev

-- 
Regards,
Pr. Olivier Gruber.
University of Grenoble-Alpes

_______________________________________________
jdt-dev mailing list
[hidden email]
To change your delivery options, retrieve your password, or unsubscribe from this list, visit
https://dev.eclipse.org/mailman/listinfo/jdt-dev